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Monday, February 28, 2011

Chocolate Pots de Creme

T U E S D A Y S   W I T H   D O R I E
Special thanks to your hostess: Christine of BlackCatCooking

ME: “I made you some Pots de Creme - a French pudding that's baked rather than cooked on the stovetop”.
DAD:  “I always thought it was pronounced 'poe de creme' . . . ”
Uncomfortable silence.
ME:  “Yes, I knew that . . . ”


You would think after watching and baking along with my authentic French “kitchen-aid” - a handy little YouTube video from France, that I would figure out simple pronunciations before spouting off. I felt like I was creating haute cuisine, although I didn't understand a world of it. A wonderful little video to get you in the mood.



Never having made “stovetop” pudding [aside from creme anglaise or creme patissierie], this baked version was somewhat more complicated than the Jell-O Instant Pudding mix I'm used to making *gasp*. With just 4 ounces of chocolate and 3 cups of cream/milk, I thought this dessert would be rather bland. After mixing in egg yolks and sugar, the "creme" is poured into ramekins or a reasonable facsimile. I could only find some old pyrex cups, which worked just fine. Baked in a bain marie - I'm just reeling off all kinds of French terms here - these little puddings firm up and turn a slightly darker chocolate color. After cooling, they're refrigerated and eaten chilled or at room temperature. I must say, these puddings are much more richer and creamier than instant - and much more chocolaty than I had expected. It must be the heat from the baking that brings out the chocolate flavor. Something you don't get from a box of Jell-O Pudding. At least I know how to pronounce Jell-O. C'est magnifique!

   – mike


19 comments:

Cakelaw said...

A cute post. I love the top photo - makes me want to dive straight in.

Aveen said...

I wouldn't worry, I have a patisserie teacher at college (who really should know better) who pronounces focaccia as "focaysha".

Your little chocolate pots look very tasty indeed and I love the white and yellow dishes, they look very vintage :)

Valerie said...

I love that you really got into the spirit of this dessert! Perhaps the next David Lebovitz? :D

Great photos! They make me want to make these again.

Sis. Boom. said...

Looks wonderful no matter how you say it. And I actually like those glass ramekins!

Kenn said...

Pots, Poe, whatever... it makes no difference. Absolutely delicious and beautiful. Better than that boxed stuff, eh?

Peggy the Baker said...

I also English-ized the pronunciation but my tactful husband (who has the benefit of High School French) corrected me before I described them to our guests. They were so well received that an 80-year-old retired professor who is not skilled in the kitchen, asked for the recipe. I'll be anxious to see how his foray into the kitchen turns out!

Nicole said...

These were really great. I'm not sure how you saw it either, but it's ok.

Jessica said...

Yes, lots of French lessons for us this week - these were truly magnifique. I love all your little dishes - are you sure you're not a secret food stylist?

Spike said...

oh, I love your dish. It doesn't really matter how you pronounce it, it's the taste darling. and it sounds like you were a winner there.

Tia said...

great job - cute post!!!
Buttercreambarbie

Aisha Jameel said...

wow ! lovely dishes and a really good presentation :) will definitely try this out
I have a blog too http://kitchensojourn.blogpot.com .I would be really happy if you follow it !

Nancy/n.o.e said...

Those pesky French culinary terms can present quite a pronounciation dilemma for us non-French people, can't they? I love your ramekins; much better than my everyday ones, but the cup and saucer combination is STUNNING! And isn't it magic how that chocolate flavor suddenly appeared once these were cooked and chilled?

Loving the bells and whistles you've added to your blog - want to come fix mine?

Jules Someone said...

Hehehe. You've been pwned. ;-) Nice poe de cream!

Clivia said...

Gorgeous photos! You really captured the rich creamy texture of these.

AmyRuth said...

Hi Mike, I love your page...spectacular!!! Was surprised how much HS French I remembered LOL. Lovely, post and you continue to amuse me with your humor. Have a great weekend.
AmyRuth

Di said...

Finally, a good use for my many years of high school and college French. It's not much help here in Texas (where Spanish would be much more useful), but at least I know how to pronounce all these culinary terms. =) I was surprised how chocolatey these turned out, too.

Kayte said...

What is it they say in My Fair Lady? The French don't care what you do actually as long as you pronounce it properly? LOL. Who cares...the proof is in the pudding, right? And obviously you did that to perfection...and leave it to you to have the perfect little pot to dress it all up!

star said...

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star said...

cute............. Movers and packers Shimla